Last one out of the Kinjaverse, turn out the lights.
Last one out of the Kinjaverse, turn out the lights.

I use the Android Waze app during my commute, and while driving home from work yesterday, I noticed that when I (by which I mean my friend and not actually me) was going a little above the speed limit, the GPS-based speedometer on the app showed both my speed, and the speed limit, and the circle around the my speed to indicate how much faster I was going. Update below (including more screenshots).

I hate to imagine how much faster you’d have to go to get a full red circle.
I hate to imagine how much faster you’d have to go to get a full red circle.
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Update 8/5/16: Waze has changed the look of the posted speed limit to look more like the actual post signs.

Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.
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Update 8/8/16: It also has the part of the 110 freeway between downtown and Pasadena correctly noted as having a speed limit of 55 (which some may not be able to drive).

Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.
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If you feel like this is somehow self incriminating, or you don’t need to be told you’re speeding because you already know because you’re doing it on purpose, you can find this option in the speedometer setting and opt out, or change how much above the speed limit you go before getting a warning.

Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.
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Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.

I think it would be more helpful if it went by speed above the limit, rather than percent (20 over legally qualifies you for reckless driving, btw), and hopefully that will change in a future update.

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So there you go, if you use the speedometer option, you can now be alerted when you’re speeding, or opt to turn that off because you probably already know but don’t need some app telling you.

Update: it turns out it mainly only works on freeways (Newer update: Commenter Snowdog has pointed out it works on some local streets, but that will vary by area map editors). So far the ones I’ve seen it on are the 110 and the 405 in SoCal. It also is only based on the standard speed limit. So when switching from the 110N to the 405N, even though the connector has a posted limit of 45mph, just like me, Waze still considers the limit to be 65mph.

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Update 8/5/16: Got a look at a surface street limit display a couple weeks ago but procrastinated on posting it.

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Also got some new screen shots. The speed limit doesn’t display as long as you stay under it.

Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.
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And if you take an off-ramp, or are on a street, it doesn’t work. So when I exited the 405, even though the exit limit is always under the freeway limit (or at most the same), I didn’t get the alert.

Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.
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And even though Sepulveda and Pico are both considered major streets, no speed limit info was available. Which is too bad, because those are the times it might be more helpful to know since they can change by area. In both of the cases here, it was 35mph.

Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.
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Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.

And you may have read that Waze would be adding an option to avoid difficult intersections, like just off the top of my head making a left turn onto Overland from a street with no signal light during rush hour. That option is now available, but when I checked I had to opt in. So if you’re in a qualifying city, you can give that a try too. You’ll find it in the Navigation settings.

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Illustration for article titled Waze Can Now Let You Know When Youre Speeding.

Happy driving! By which I mean “less angry but not actually happy” driving.

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