That'll be a million space bucks!

In soviet Russia, you don't call for pizza, pizza calls for YOU!

Great. Now I'm stuck at work and I have a desire to watch Spaceballs again. And I can't watch it because the dumb IT guy at school is blocking Netflix. If only there was some way around the filter.....

Haha...I would never advocate bypassing the filter on the network you use. It's there for a reason. And that reason makes sense to someone somewhere. I mean, IT guys don't just set up filters to randomly block stuff, do we? (yes. Yes we do. Don't piss us off.) I actually have one of the computers in my office set to bypass the content filter of my firewall. Because I can. And no one can say anything about it. because I can come up with a valid sounding excuse for needing it if I'm ever questioned about it. Which I never will. Because, for me to be questioned about it, the person who monitors network traffic would have to raise a flag to the powers that be. And since I'm the traffic monitor....

I actually enjoy having to monitor a network at a school. I hate doing it at businesses. At a business, you have o justify your actions. At the school, I can block a specific students computer or phone if I so choose and there isn't anything they can do about it. All I have to say is, "The firewall detected an incoming IPS Alert so I shut it down to resolve the issue". No one knows what that means, so they just say "OK, just do whatever needs to be done."

In all honesty, I don't need to do that though. All the high school students are convinced I have monitoring software on their computers anyway. And the middle school students think I have web cams in every room to monitor them. And elementary students are....well, they're gullible.

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Hoo-boy! Did I get sidetracked! I think it's time to focus on the real reason why I'm here. And that is, it's Tell The Truth Tuesday! Sit down and buckle up because I'm about to reveal the truth behind yesterdays post!

It was true. Iron in a solution does in fact turn water green. So what happened to remove the iron from the oceans and turn them blue? Why, our good friend Cyanobacteria. When it showed up, there was no oxygen in our atmosphere and the water was saturated with iron. By cyanobacteria has a trick up it's sleeve: photosynthesis. This is the process where plants take the energy from the sun and convert it into sugars by using carbon dioxide and water. The bacteria would take a water molecule and eat the hydrogen and fart out the oxygen. Over a few hundred million years, all the bacteria farted out enough oxygen that the oceans turned blue.

Which doesn't explain a lot, does it. What happened was, all that fresh oxygen in the water bonded with the iron in the solution. And that caused the iron to rust and fall to the sea floor. Where it piled up into the gigantic band of iron that we now mine to make practically everything. Once the iron in the water was gone and the oceans were blue, the oxygen started moving into the atmosphere. And after 2 billion years, oxygen levels came up to almost current levels. (in the past, there was a higher concentration of oxygen in the air. That's my things grew so huge. Like a 10 foot dragonfly. Or a 16 foot long millipede. Or the large dinosaurs.)

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So yes, iron turned the oceans green until oxygen was introduced to literally rust the iron out of the water.

Now, is anyone ready for todays oddity? Whatever, you're getting it now regardless.

Pizza: Best food ever, or just everyones favorite food?

Who here doesn't like pizza? Raise your hand so we can all see you so we know whom to hunt down after the post is over because, if you don't like pizza, you don't deserve to share the planet with us anymore. We will find you and banish you to Alpha Epsilon 6 Sigma 91.

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If you look at the population of the world, there really aren't too many people that don't like pizza. I mean, if people didn't like it, it wouldn't have been around for so long, right? Right?

But, what is pizza? If you ask me, pizza is a personal thing and it can't be defined by one set of words because pizza is whatever you want it to be. All I can do is to speak to the historical aspects of the pie.

The word pizza didn't appear until the 10th century. And then it was used to describe a variation of foccacia. Foccacia was known to the ancient Romans as 'panis focacius'. And toppings were often added. Favorites would have been olive oil, sparrow brains, onions, goat nards, sauteed squid beak an many others. That's what foccacia was, a flat bread with toppings. And most cultures had a version. Some were leavened and some weren't. Some had more toppings added and some had less, or even none.

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But, where did pizza as we know it come from?

It came from European chefs who used an new food from the new world: tomatoes. And that first happened in the 16th century. It is the addition of tomato sauce that makes a flat bread with toppings into a pizza. And by the 18th century, pizza was fairly popular amongst the working classes. It wasn't until the introduction of the 'Pizza Margherita' that the upper classes started to see it as a food they could eat as well.

And, until the late 19th century, pizza was primarily a sweet meal, not savory. Fruits and sugars were the popular toppings. Once the pizza came to America, it started to become covered in toppings. Before that, pizzas were minimalistic in their use of toppings. In fact, in Italy there are only two kinds of "Pure Pizzas"; Pizza Margherita and Pizza Marinara. The first has only mozzarella, sauce and fresh basil. The second has only tomato, oregano, garlic and olive oil. These are the pizza most Italians eat.

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Personally, I like gobs of spicy sausage on my pizza. With some onions. And lots of gooey cheese. But I will eat most pizzas. Unless they are gross and have things like peppers, olives or mushrooms on them. And if you dare serve me a pizza with pickles on it, you had best run. Fast and far.