I'm a fan of Windows Phone.

There I said it. Now that we got that out the way it's interesting to me that Nokia continues to partner with AT&T when it seems as if the AT&T Store staff tend to be either - untrained in how to sell Windows Phone or uninformed that they have exclusivity on the flagship devices.

This bit is all anecdotal and I don't claim to know what kind of training employees receive on new devices, however it seems that the few stores I've walked into in NYC, AT&T staff members couldn't properly identify the latest flagship Lumia (there was a huge window display yet still couldn't pick it out) or tried selling the biggest "feature" as "the colors."

I like the bright yellow Lumia, but no mention of the 41-megapixel sensor? Sounds like they didn't really know much about the actual phone. When asked what was the difference between WP, Andriod, and iOS the most informed answer was "WP had a lack of apps," the least informed was "you need a Windows computer to work a WP but not with Android or iOS."

Why did I bother asking or going to the stores in the first place? Because my biggest concern as a technophile isn't a spec sheet, it's about how people are relating to technology. What good is cramming a monstrous imaging sensor and processor into a phone if people can't relate to it in human terms. Having a 1080p screen on your phone may be important to some, but the vast majority don't know how it affects their interaction with their phones - many more probably won't be affected at all.

IMHO here lies Nokia/Microsoft's biggest hurdle: Why should I care about your phone/OS? The commercials are funny and Cam Newton likes his phone - that's great, but none of these things will make me care any more about your phone than a budget Android phone that's free on contract. If the people selling your wares can't give a convincing argument over anything else in the store, why should I give it a second look?