For those who are keeping track at home, the number of people indicted under the 1917 Espionage Act under the Obama administration "is more than all previous presidential administrations combined."

Perhaps we also should be asking, why are more and more government employees becoming so desperate to share information with the American public?

7. Thomas Drake, NSA officer

6. Shamai Leibowitz, FBI translator

5. Bradley Manning, Army private

4. Stephen Kim, State Department contractor

3. Jeffrey Sterling, CIA officer

2. John Kiriakou, CIA officer

1. James F. Hitselberger, Navy linguist

From the article,

The Espionage Act is a law from 1917 that was intended to criminalize individuals who engaged in spying, not leakers or whistleblowers. It was not initially used to prosecute government employees who passed on information to a reporter or a media organization. But, under Obama, the Justice Department has exercised wide discretion and interpreted the law as one that can be used to criminalize government employees who blow the whistle on corrupti.on or share information on operations, policies or programs with the press. They have used to prosecute them as if they are “insiders,” “informers,” or “spies.”

Also, for people who keep thinking the NSA needs a warrant to spy on you, the Electronic Frontier Foundation put together a handy explainer based on the newly released NSA docs (thanks to Snowden) entitled In Depth Review: New NSA Documents Expose How Americans Can Be Spied on Without A Warrant.